After Hours Emergencies: 860-639-5130 | 911

Uncas Health District periodically offers ServSafe classes. ServSafe® meets the CT Public Health Code requirements for Qualified Food Operator certification for Class III & IV food service establishments. A ServSafe national certified instructors and registered examination proctors will teach the course to individuals seeking to become qualified food operators.

The training course cost is $145.00 per person and includes a ServSafe® Manager textbook, ServSafe diagnostic/practice test, full day course (8:00 am – 4:00 pm), examination, and a ServSafe® Food Protection Manager Certificate (for individuals who pass the exam).  The certificate is available online to the passing participant approximately 2 weeks after the course is taken.   The retest fee for failed exams is available for $72.50.

All materials should be reviewed prior to the class. The instructor will assume the student has read the textbook and completed the included Diagnostic Test before attending the course. For this reason, NO WALK INS are permitted.

Cancellation Policy: This class is non-refundable, if you need to reschedule for any reason you must do so within 5 days of your scheduled class to be moved to another date. 

NEXT CLASS DATE IS Thursday, May 17, 2018 - click here for REGISTRATION FORM

 

The Teen Oureach Program is a working partnership with Norwich Public Schools, ASPIRE After School Program, Uncas Health District, and the Connecticut Department of Social Services.

The Teen Outreach Program was introduced in 1978 and is nationally recognized as a proven model effective in promoting the positive growth and development of youth. The program is offered in 17 states in the United States and reaches over 15,000 youths.

Evidence has shown that teens that complete this program have:

52% lower risk of school suspension

60% lower risk of course failure

53% lower risk of pregnancy

The program focuses on self-awareness and coping skills to deal with emotions that arise from peer pressures and accepting responsibility for yourself and your own choices; healthy behaviors in exploration of values, goal setting, life skills and relationships; creating a safe place for youth to participate and discuss difficult issues.

The Teen Outreach Program's primary intervention strategy is based in Community Service Learning (CLS)/Volunteering. CLS is a teaching method and youth development approach that enriches learning by engaging youth in meaningful direct, in-direct of civic action (advocacy)service i their schools and communities.

To learn more about the program offered in the Norwich Public Schools, please contact Patrick McCormack, DOH at 860-823-1189 Ext. 112

The Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) is a community-based volunteer organization sponsored by the Office of the U.S. Surgeon General. The mission of the Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) is to improve the health and safety of communities across the country by organizing and utilizing public health, medical and other volunteers. As a member of your local Medical Reserve Corps, you will be trained and ready to help your community in times of emergency. You also get the opportunity to support other public health activities such as health screenings and educational events.

The MRC welcomes medical, health, and non-medical volunteers. Eligible individuals include:

  • Practicing or retired medical and health professionals, i.e., doctors, nurses, emergency medical technicians, dentists, veterinarians, pharmacists, nurse assistants, and others
  • Public health professionals
  • Members of the helping professions, i.e., behavioral/mental health, social services, judicial, and finance
  • Volunteers from the trades and those with other skills
  • Anyone who wants to help
  • United States citizenship is not required to join the Medical Reserve Corps. Non-citizen, legal U.S. residents are welcome. Volunteers must be at least 18 years of age.

For more information please visit the Medical Reserve Corps website at http://www.medicalreservecorps.gov/HomePage.

Free training will be provided to all volunteers. In the case of an emergency, volunteers always have the right to decline for any reason. If you do respond to our call, you are protected from liability.

Want to be a part of something big? Join your local MRC!

Uncas Health District Street, 401 West Thames Street, Suite 106, Norwich, CT 06360
Towns of Bozrah, Griswold, Lisbon, Montville, Norwich, Sprague and Voluntown
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The Ledge Ledge Light Health District, 943 North Road, Groton, CT 06340
Towns of East Lyme, Groton, Ledyard, New London and Waterford
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Northeast Department of Health, 69 South Main Street, Unit 4, Brooklyn, CT 06234
Towns of Brooklyn, Canterbury, Eastford, Hampton, Killingly, Plainfield, Pomfret, Putnam, Thompson, Woodstock and Union
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Uncas Health District has been awarded a grant from the Connecticut Department of Public Health to allow individuals to do the single most important thing they can do for their health which is to be tobacco-free.  Our program offers either a class environment or one on one aid in quiting, as well as FREE nicotene replacement therapy.  Please contact our coordinator today for more details - Connie Capacchione (860) 823-1189 ext. 122 or email her at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

  • Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S
  • There are more than 7,000 chemicals in tobacco smoke. Hundreds of these chemicals are toxic and about 70 are known to cause cancer in humans and animals, and at least 250 in second hand smoke have been shown to damage health 
  • Heart disease is the # 1 cause of death in the US and in Connecticut, and smoking is the #1 cause of heart disease

Smoking leads to disease and disability and harms nearly every organ of the body. More than 16 million Americans are living with a disease caused by smoking. For every person who dies because of smoking, at least 30 people live with a serious smoking-related illness. Smoking causes cancer, heart disease, stroke, lung diseases, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Smoking also increases risk for tuberculosis, certain eye diseases, and problems of the immune system, including rheumatoid arthritis.

Secondhand smoke exposure contributes to approximately 41,000 deaths among nonsmoking adults and 400 deaths in infants each year. Secondhand smoke causes stroke, lung cancer, and coronary heart disease in adults. Children who are exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk for sudden infant death syndrome, acute respiratory infections, middle ear disease, more severe asthma, respiratory symptoms, and slowed lung growth.

GET ON THE PATH TO A HEALTHIER YOU

If you quit smoking right now...

Within 20 minutes: Your heart rate and blood pressure drop.1

Within 12 hours: The carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal.2

Within 3 months: Your circulation and lung function improves.3

Within 9 months: You will cough less and breathe easier.4

After 1 year: Your risk of coronary heart disease is cut in half.5

After 5 years: Your risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, and bladder are cut in half. Your risk of cervical cancer and stroke return to normal after 5 years.6

After 10 years: You are half as likely to die from lung cancer. Your risk of larynx or pancreatic cancer decreases.7

After 15 years: Your risk of coronary heart disease is the same as a non-smoker’s.8

Sources

  • Effect of smoking on arterial stiffness and pulse pressure amplification, Mahmud A, Feely J. Hypertension. 2003:41:183
  • US Surgeon General’s Report, 1988, p. 202
  • US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp.193, 194,196, 285, 323
  • US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp. 285-287, 304
  • US Surgeon General’s Report, 2010, p. 359
  • A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease – The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease Fact Sheet, 2010; and Tobacco Control: Reversal of Risk After Quitting SmokingIARC Handbooks of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 11. 2007, p 341
  • A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease – The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease Fact Sheet, 2010; and US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp. vi, 155, 165
  • Tobacco Control: Reversal of Risk After Quitting SmokingIARC Handbooks of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 11. p 11

For more information contact:

Connie Capacchione, Program Coordinator
Phone: 860-823-1189 x122
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

401 West Thames Street - Suite 106Norwich, CT 06360 860-823-1189